The Value of Blog Comments and Serendipity to Creativity

Haystack

Serendipity has often led me to wonderful discoveries of obscure wisdom buried by information overload. Ingrained into this excessive load, are blog posts, which are designed for instantaneous consumption of information, after which they are piled up in a corner of cyberspace, forgotten.

Until someone—the blogger or an inquisitive reader—decides to uncover them.

If a blog post were a needle in a giant, ever-expanding haystack, then a blog comment would be a grain of sand underneath that needle. Indeed, a comment is usually read only by the person it is directed to, even though it can equally contain insights too valuable to ignore. Fortunately, on a fortuitous day, random chance can lead us to the unexpected discovery of these insights.

I’ve already shared Melissa Janda‘s thoughtful comment on how blog awards can alleviate a writer’s loneliness. I’ve also shared how my discussion with Julie Israel inspired another post titled “On Education, the Arts, and Writing”. In this post, I’m going to share two more comments I’ve received from two other bloggers, which I hope will inspire you as they did me. Continue reading

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Find Your Element, Overcome Obstacles: 3 Success Stories

The Element cover“We all have distinctive talents and passions that can inspire us to achieve far more than we may imagine,” writes Sir Ken Robinson, Ph.D., in his phenomenal book, “The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything”.

He encourages every one of us to find our Element, “the place where the things you love to do and the things that you are good at come together.”

Some call it “the sweet spot.”

Unfortunately, it’s not always easy. I know that the “necessity” to settle into a routine, to choose job security over job satisfaction, can prevent you from doing what you love. You drift further away from your Element each day, thinking it’s the safest route to take—while the opposite is true. Continue reading

On Education, the Arts, and Writing

Japanese_classroom

First of all, let me just say how funny writing is, and the process through which any written material comes to fruition. This particular post is the result of my discussion with Julie Israel a few days ago. One thing led to another, and soon we found ourselves talking about education.

Respect the arts

Unfortunately, we live in a society where the arts—and writers, in particular—are not appreciated. First I thought that it was strictly an Asian thing. But Julie soon confirmed, “Even in the States, writers are not thought particularly high of. Certainly some are; but generally-speaking, I think, writing is not seen as prestigious work. Even when it comes to basic schooling, which has been hurting financially in recent years, the arts are usually the first thing to go.”

Why is that? Continue reading